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Scotiabank Giller Prize 2020 Longlist

Scotiabank Giller Prize 2020 Longlist

Posted by Elisa on September 15, 2020

Start reading! The winner will be announced on November 9th.

The judges announced their longlist for the Giller Prize, a $100,000 Canadian fiction award. The links below will take you to our catalogue, which lists print and eBook copies. Place your holds now!

The longlist for the 2020 Scotiabank Giller Prize is:

Gil Adamson, for her novel, Ridgerunner. Part literary Western and part historical mystery, Ridgerunner is the follow-up to Gil Adamson’s award-winning and critically acclaimed novel The Outlander.

David Bergen, for his short story collection, Here The Dark. From the streets of Danang, Vietnam, where a boy falls in with a young American missionary, to fishermen lost off the islands of Honduras, to the Canadian prairies, where a teenage boy's infatuation reveals his naiveté and an aging rancher finds himself smitten, the short stories in Here the Dark explore the spaces between doubt and belief, evil and good, obscurity and light.

Lynn Coady, for her novel, Watching You Without Me. Lynn Coady delivers a creepy and wholly compelling novel about the complex relationship between mothers and daughters and sisters, women and men, and who to trust and how to trust in a world where the supposedly selfless act of caregiving can camouflage a sinister self-interest.

Eva Crocker, for her novel, All I Ask. A little before seven in the morning, Stacey wakes to the police pounding on her door. They search her home and seize her computer and her phone, telling her they're looking for "illegal digital material." Left to unravel what's happened, Stacey must find a way to take back the privacy and freedom she feels she has lost.

Emma Donoghue, for her novel, Pull of The Stars. Dublin, 1918: three days in a maternity ward at the height of the Great Flu. In an Ireland doubly ravaged by war and disease, Nurse Julia Power works at an understaffed hospital in the city center, where expectant mothers who have come down with the terrible new Flu are quarantined together.

Francesca Ekwuyasi, for her novel, Butter Honey Pig Bread. An intergenerational saga about three Nigerian women: a novel about food, family, and forgiveness.

Michelle Good, for her novel, Five Little Indians. Taken from their families when they are very small and sent to a remote, church-run residential school, Kenny, Lucy, Clara, Howie and Maisie are barely out of childhood when they are finally released after years of detention. Alone and without any skills, support or families, the teens find their way to the seedy and foreign world of Downtown Eastside Vancouver.

Kaie Kellough, for his short story collection, Dominoes At The Crossroads. In this collection of stories, Kaie Kellough’s characters navigate race, history, and coming-of-age by way of their confessions and dreams. Through the eyes of jazz musicians, hitchhikers, quiet suburbanites, student radicals, secret agents, historians, and their fugitive slave ancestors, Kellough guides us from the cobblestones of Montreal’s Old Port to the foliage of a South American rainforest, from a basement in wartime Paris to an underground antique shop in Montréal during the October Crisis, allowing the force of imagination to tip the balance of time like a line of dominoes.

Thomas King, for his novel, Indians On Vacation. Inspired by a handful of old postcards sent by Uncle Leroy nearly a hundred years earlier, Bird and Mimi attempt to trace Mimi's long-lost uncle and the family medicine bundle he took with him to Europe.

Annabel Lyon, for her novel, Consent. A smart, mysterious and heartbreaking novel centred on two sets of sisters whose lives are braided together when tragedy changes them forever.

Shani Mootoo, for her novel, Polar Vortex. Are we ever free from our pasts? Can we ever truly know the people we are closest to? Seductive and tension-filled, Polar Vortex is a story of secrets, deceptions, and revenge.

Emily St. John Mandel, for her novel, The Glass Hotel. From the author of Station Eleven comes a captivating novel of money, beauty, white-collar crime, ghosts and moral compromise in which a woman disappears from a container ship off the coast of Mauritania and a massive Ponzi scheme implodes in New York, dragging countless fortunes with it.

Seth, for his graphic novel, Clyde Fans. The legendary Canadian cartoonist Seth lovingly shows the rituals, hopes, and delusions of a middle class that has long ceased to exist in North America--garrulous men in wool suits extolling the virtues of their wares to taciturn shopkeepers with an eye on the door.

Souvankham Thammavongsa, for her short story collection, How To Pronounce Knife. A young man painting nails at the local salon. A woman plucking feathers at a chicken processing plant. A father who packs furniture to move into homes he'll never afford. A housewife learning English from daytime soap operas. In her stunning debut book of fiction, O. Henry Award winner Souvankham Thammavongsa focuses on characters struggling to make a living, illuminating their hopes, disappointments, love affairs, acts of defiance, and above all their pursuit of a place to belong.

The longlist was selected by a panel of five judges: Mark Sakamoto, Eden Robinson, David Chariandy, Tom Rachman and Claire Armitstead.

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